Login
Email address

Password
Register | Forgotten password?
Illustration for Today

dressed-himself - medium

It’s very tempting to jump in and help your child in all sorts of situations. Allowing them to try things out, like dressing themselves, teaches them how to look after themselves, even if you do find it slightly frustrating at times! Download Book 1, ‘Being a Parent’ FREE right now!

Read more…

Follow Us on Twitter

PostHeaderIcon Supernanny Corner

Welcome to the Parenting Skills Online ‘Supernanny Corner’, where we answer your queries regarding parenting issues. Before you can ask Supernanny a question you will need to register. Then you can post your question, which will be published on the website once it has been reviewed for editorial content and suitability.

Please note that Parenting Skills Online reserves the right to withhold or edit questions on the basis of suitability for the website. However, every email will receive a reply, whether the question is posted or not.

Already registered? Ask Supernanny a question now.

PostHeaderIcon Post Partum Depression: A guide

Laura Jones from London used to work in the healthcare sector, undertaking various roles with mental health teams. After the birth of her first child she took a sabbatical due to suffering from Post Natal Depression, and after she recovered decided to devote some of her time to reading, researching and writing on the topic.

It’s estimated that as many as 15% of all women who give birth may well suffer from some form of post-natal depression. Of course, this is a very conservative estimate as there could be many more women who simply do not come forward to talk to a healthcare professional about their problems at all. Some studies go as far as to suggest this figure could be closer to 40%1.

As with many conditions that involve mental health, there is an awful lot of stigma, confusion and taboo, which needs to be broken down so that mothers feel they can come forward and talk about their issues properly and have them addressed in a sensitive manner.

Post Partum Depression2 comes in two separate forms, the first of which is known as post partum blues – a short-term mild form of depression which starts after the birth and lasts for a few days or weeks, passing off without any further problems. The second form is port partum major depression which again, may start at the same time, but does not abate and needs more care and intervention to ensure it recedes.

The symptoms are broadly the same as with other forms of depression; there may be feelings of worthlessness, guilt, suicidal thoughts and a complete loss of interest in life, despite the fact that the time surrounding the birth of a baby should be a joyous one.

However, one major factor is the role of hormones in how badly a patient can become affected and how easy it can be to treat it. Treatment of course depends on the willingness of the patient to open up and admit she needs help, which isn’t always an easy thing to do. The patient will need kindness, understanding and empathy from family, friends and loved ones.

Encouraging a PPD sufferer to talk about their feelings is a really good way to help them deal with their condition, as is allowing them an outlet to deal with what is on their mind. Medication and other talking therapies can be very useful and go a long way to helping someone cope.

1 http://seleni.org/advice-support/article/largest-postpartum-depression-study-reveals-disturbing-statistics

2 http://www.psychguides.com/guides/living-with-postpartum-depression/

 

Supernanny says: No one should suffer in silence with any form of depression and help and solutions are out there. Following the birth of a baby, most women’s hormones do return to normal after a few months but there is always the exception to the rule, so do seek help from your doctor if you feel you are not coping. Counselling is another excellent means to helping a mother to cope, and this enables them to talk through any difficulties in total confidence.

 

Search
FAQs
Is this course aimed at making me a perfect parent?
Answer
Testimonials

“A wonderful bedside reading companion for me as a new mother; it contains great practical advice, which will be a huge asset as my baby gets bigger.”

– J.H. Parkside

Featured Book
Cover06 - medium
Cover06 - large
This book introduces the benefits of learning to listen and how to start the ball rolling in enabling your children to talk about issues that maybe bothering them. Importantly, it also looks at what may get in the way of listening and why sometimes we find this hard to do.
Acknowledging a person’s feelings when they are upset is possibly one of the most useful things you can do. However, a lot of times, we try and fix the problem, offer advice, distract or give an opinion and this can make the matter worse because the feelings are stuck inside with nowhere to go.

Someone who encourages us to express our feelings is a person we’d find more understanding and helpful. Having feelings acknowledged has the effect of helping us to actually let go of them and move onto whatever is lying underneath. This in turn, enables us to become clear and solve our own problems and is something that children need to learn to do.

Book 6 – Introduction to Listening
Recommended Links
Find us on Facebook
 Copyright Parenting Skills Online 2018 - All Rights Reserved Site by Webspeed